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Saturday, 24 August 2013

Jantz replies

So I was a bit naughty and decided to openly pick a fight with Gregory Jantz over an appalling  article in Psychology Today.

He has replied to the questions raised about his treatment method ("All eating disorders arise from abuse") thus.

"I'd like to add that abuse may be in the form of “unmet emotional needs.” We understand there may be some associated controversy, but it's important to note ours is a whole-person approach, which does acknowledge the biological issues -- an approach that has proven invaluable to the 35,000 patients we've treated over the past 30 years. Our model is not that of blame nor shame, rather getting to the root cause or causes, whatever they are in nature."

What is a whole person approach?  If you should care to (and I suggest a strong stomach is needed for this), you can trawl through his Place of Hope website to understand it.  Or you can just go with my quick précis.

The free consumer guide contains gems of wisdom amongst the blatant marketing of Jantz's books.  Gems such as eating disorders come from respected authority figures making negative comments about weight and shape; stressful life events; dysfunctional families; and the depiction of body image in the media.

Oh oh oh, did I forget to mention to the physical, sexual and emotional abuse?

Don't panic, my friends.  You just have to buy Jantz's book "Healing the scars of emotional abuse" to understand it all.....(Available on Amazon 2nd hand for just 1 cent....).  To give him credit, he does talk a bit about refeeding.  Because you are lucky enough to be under his care, he can SELL you the right supplements to help you get better, including "Thin for Life".  Yes, that's right folks.....

Do I need to talk to you about the dental service he provides?  He has a nice friendly cosmetic dentist that is happy to come in and fix your teeth.  I have no idea how much it costs, doubt it is covered by any insurance policy on the planet and wonder what's in it for the Place of Hope in monetary terms but, hey, why not sell another unnecessary service to a bunch of mentally ill people who, in the main, have a problem with the way they look.  Cynical?  Me?

His "Characteristics of those who develop food-related problems" is about the most offensive crackpot, non-scientific load of bollox thing I have read in a long long time:

Perfectionist defined as "often first born" with "high expectations from father"
Mothers permanently dieting
Emotionally distant father
Often had a mother that was co-dependent (ie father was an addict)
Homes with overstrict and physical punishment
Parents who use Guilt and Shame to punish
Homes where sexuality (not sex, please note) was not discussed or considered "dirty"
Fathers who used daughters to complain about mothers
Homes in which children were forced to be adults
Sexual abuse, including fondling and incest
Neglect
Verbal abuse
An addiction to dieting (WTF????)
Desire to overplease
Overusing food for pleasure or reward
Not expressing anger

But, wait, here's a bit on the biology......Are you ready?

"Brain allergies" 
(D'ya think that is why you might need to buy a supplement or two?  For all those brain allergies you have? Do ya?  Do ya?)

(For a better understanding of risk factors for Anorexia Nervosa, the Mayo Clinic has not a bad list).

Oh oh oh and don't forget, folks.  This is all done in the name of God.

"We believe and understand that Hope is available for every person. In 24 years of treatment, we’ve seen countless miracles of God’s grace, manifested through our whole-person care for addictions and other issues."








3 comments:

  1. I so hope that this charlatan will be struck off and never allowed to practice anywhere in the world, ever again. He is so dangerous!!! Thank goodness you've made a large number of people aware of him and his frightening, appalling nonsense.

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  2. I really wish that, four years ago, as my son fell off a cliff into the turmoil of anorexia, that I'd known that (a) his illness waas my faut and that I had, somewhere along the line, probably abused my son, (b) that my H was probably an addict and was emotionally distant, (c) that God could heal my son, (d) that it was a 'brain allergy' and all I needed to give my son was a few pills, (e) that, presumably, we'd been violent towards our son and caused him to grow up too early... and so on and so forth...

    I really think I would have understood my son's illness better.

    And, yes, the PTSD-style nightmare I had last night, where I very vividly dreamed that my son died, could have come true if I'd believed all this stuff and sat back and done very little except feel guilty, point the finger at my H, check our family Bible was an up to date translation and produced that box of crayons he mentions.

    Oh, and done something about my god-damn-awful teeth!

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  3. I'm sorry Charlotte, but I can't stop laughing. Turn to tears of rage soon, probably tho.

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