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Tuesday, 10 January 2012

Fluffy bunnies?

For those of you who have half an hour, here is a fun way to spend it (not!).  Whilst I am aware that these people have their hearts in the right place, it seems to me that the news that eating disorders are a brain disorder (sorry Extralongtail!) has not yet reached them.

Whilst I think that "fat talk" is uncouth and unnecessary, I have no particular problem with a few wrinkles and was totally unaware that "wrinkle" talk was now being targeted, in an effort to make us feel better about ourselves (and thus "prevent" an eating disorder???).

This survey is written and skewed so that it can be produced during Eating Disorders Awareness Week with a great fanfare, saying how much women hate themselves.

Questions:

1. Men?  They are not exactly encouraged to participate.
2. Calling the girl who thinks she's fat, Anna, is not particularly clever - is this subliminal messaging?
3. Who is going to fill in this survey outside of the eating disorders world?
4.  Why?  Just why?

http://uwepsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_41I7zKZN7XbvJYg

4 comments:

  1. You should email and complain - I found the contact details below of the people running that survey...I do love the woman who runs the Succeed Foundation (she's got anorexia) but they clearly have not got the right approach!

    Dr Carolyn Becker
    Email: cbecker@trinity.edu
    Department of Psychology,
    Trinity University, USA

    Dr Phillippa Diedrichs
    Email: phillippa.diedrichs@uwe.ac.uk
    Centre for Appearance Research
    University of the West of England, UK

    Mr Glen Jankowski
    Email: glen.jankowski@uwe.ac.uk
    Centre for Appearance Research
    University of the West of England, UK

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's a silly study, more for the link to EDs than for the topic itself. If it had been presented as research into a problematic form of female bonding I could have understood, because it is certainly true that many women will bitch and moan about their bodies as a way of finding common ground with others. I find that sort of talk highly irritating and would welcome attempts to expose how counterproductive it is to forming real friendships. Additionally, many people in recovery from eating disorders find that sort of talk extremely triggering, because they know they are not "allowed" to join in with the dieting and self abuse when every wonky neuronal pathway in their brains wants to desperately.

    However, it is not a cause of eating disorders and it's damaging and stupid to suggest that it is. I have responded to the survey saying as much, but I highly doubt that any of these researchers/supporters will listen to the objections. No harm in trying, I guess.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh, and I became extremely suspicious when the part about "old talk" started. It seemed related to the ancient and outdated theory that anorexia is a way of remaining childlike and avoiding adult responsibilities/sexuality/guff like that. My hackles come right up when that sort of theory starts being bandied around again.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'll write to Carolyn Becker... I lost the will to live trying to complete the questionnaire...

    The Succeed Foundation are well-meaning, but they are focusing on fluffy, run-of-the-mill, irrelevant stuff that will merely confuse people in regard to the aetiology and treatment of EDs (and especially AN).

    ReplyDelete